Postgraduate Publication of Results 20/21

Key dates 2020/21

The date for the release of progression results following the June Progression Board of Examiners is Friday 9th July 2021.  

The date for the release of award decisions following the October Awarding Board of Examiners is Friday 5th November 2021.

Release of results

All results will be communicated to you via the EUCLID student view in MyEd. This will include your Award decision if you are due to graduate in November. You will also receive your Dissertation mark and feedback on this date if you were eligible to complete your Dissertation in the 2020/21 session.

You will receive an automated email to your University email account when your award decision is ready to view on EUCLID.

What to do if you have a question or concern about your results

If you have questions or concerns about award or dissertation results, we recommend you speak to your Programme Director in the first instance. If you cannot reach your Programme Director, then please contact the Postgraduate Office on pg.law@ed.ac.uk (on-campus students) or the Online Learning Team at law.online@ed.ac.uk (online students).

If you submitted a special circumstances request, you will be contacted individually following the release of the course results to explain the outcome of your special circumstances claim.

Please refer to the Special Circumstances Policy for guidance or contact the relevant office as above.

Degree and Assessment Regulations

The University’s Taught Assessment Regulations governs how courses and programmes are assessed. These Regulations also include links to the University’s Common Marking Scheme which is applied for all the School’s assessed work, including examinations.

The University’s regulations governing postgraduate degree programmes will be published shortly on the DRPS site.

It should be noted that a number of updates have been made to University regulations in response to the Covid19 pandemic. Full details of any changes can be found on the assessment and exams section of the Covid19 current student microsite.

Progression to the Masters Dissertation

Regulation 56 – Postgraduate assessment progression

In order for students to progress to the Masters dissertation, students must pass the assessment requirements of the taught stage of their degree at an appropriate level at the first attempt, and must meet the following criteria:

a) pass at least 60 credits with a mark of at least 50% in each of the courses which make up these credits; and

b) attain an average of at least 50% for the 120 credits of study examined at the point of decision for progression; and

c) satisfy any other specific requirements for the Masters degree programme that are clearly stated in respective programme handbooks or Degree Programme Table.

It should be noted that a number of updates have been made to University regulations in response to the Covid19 pandemic.

View the mitigation of the impact of Covid on assessments webpage

Award of a Masters Degree

You are eligible for a Masters award (LLM or MSc) if you have successfully progressed to the dissertation and:

Postgraduate Award

  • Obtained an additional 60 credits for the dissertation, with a minimum mark of 50%.

Postgraduate Merit

  • To achieve a merit, a student must be awarded at least 60% on the University’s Postgraduate Common Marking Scheme for the dissertation, if the programme has a dissertation element, and must achieve an average of at least 60% across taught courses taken;

Postgraduate Distinction

  • To achieve a distinction, a student must be awarded at least 70% on the University’s Postgraduate Common Marking Scheme for the dissertation, if the programme has a dissertation element, and must achieve an average of at least 70% across taught courses taken;

Where the Board of Examiners are assigning a classification or awarding Merit/Distinction, Boards will need to be satisfied that they have seen sufficient evidence of performance at the required level to justify the award.

Borderline Decisions

Borderline marks are defined as marks three percentage points below the boundary and up to the boundary itself. For example, 37.00 to 39.99% or 67.00 to 69.99%. The Board of Examiners must consider students whose marks are borderline for award purposes.

The Edinburgh Law School will apply the following policy in deciding on Distinction and Merit awards in borderline cases:

  • Where a student does not qualify for a Distinction as of right, they may be considered by the Board if their dissertation mark and credit-weighted average mark across all taught courses are both 67.00% or higher.
  • Where a student does not qualify for a Merit as of right, they may be considered by the Board if their dissertation mark and credit-weighted average mark across all taught courses are both 57.00% or higher.

The decision whether or not to award a Merit or Distinction in such cases is at the discretion of the Board of Examiners. The Board of Examiners will use its academic judgement to assign the award to the higher class if there is sufficient evidence of achievement at that higher class. Assigning the higher class to a student in a borderline case does not involve any change to individual course results.

Academic Appeals

The University has in place a process for an Academic Appeal, following the release of results. An Appeal is a request for a decision made by a Board of Examiners relating to marks, progression, degree classification and/or degree award to be reconsidered.

It is important to note that the appeal process cannot be used to challenge academic judgment. That is, you cannot submit an appeal simply because you believe that you deserve a better mark. There are specific grounds under which an Academic Appeal may be submitted. These are set out in the relevant university Academic Appeal Regulations.

For more information and guidance on the University’s Academic Appeals processes please go to: https://www.ed.ac.uk/academic-services/students/appeals

If you are considering lodging an appeal, it is important that you act promptly.

The School strongly recommends that if you are considering submitting an Academic Appeal you should first study the guidance on the Appeals webpages, then contact the EUSA Advice Place, where trained advisers can offer guidance and support.

The Advice Place provides information on this support service, and contact details at:

http://www.eusa.ed.ac.uk/adviceplace/academic/appeals/